Enjoy unlimited access to all forum features for FREE! Optional upgrade available for extra perks.
Daily Diamond

closed Good idea?

This thread has been closed by the original author or DNF staff member.
Status
Not open for further replies.

abrams1117

Level 5
Legacy Gold Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2002
Messages
267
Reaction score
0
Feedback: 0 / 0 / 0
Instead of registering worthless DN's maybe
someone (bennoart?) could appraise them BEFORE they are registered?

What about sending a SINGLE email with the list of DN's and just waiting until/ or IF
you get a response.

No response means none of them are good.

All the DN's worth registering would come back by email and have a Y next to them.

Y= yes

After a sale you split the profit.

Going through countless junk until a good one comes up probably wouldn't be worth it though....???
 
Domain Summit 2024

fizz

Level 8
Legacy Platinum Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2002
Messages
1,315
Reaction score
1
Feedback: 0 / 0 / 0
and I = I just regged it :)
 

namedancer

Level 4
Legacy Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2002
Messages
136
Reaction score
1
Feedback: 0 / 0 / 0
Interesting line of thought abrams. A group of speculators could get together with the agreement that none in the group would reg the other's domain suggestions until the originator had passed on it. Each would appraise the others unregged domain ideas in a closed forum, the originator could then either reg it himself or pass on it and let another if anyone wanted to. Might not work as well for drops, but for expired and never/registereds.
You might have a maximum number of domains each could submit, say five a day.

I'd have to wait until I was in better regging form to participate in such a group now myself, but I bet you could find a few right here in this forum!
 

Guest
Originally posted by fizz
and I = I just regged it :)

Good one!

But seriously...I think a really good rule of thumb is, if you need a second opinion before you simply register a domain name (as opposed to buying it in the secondary market for hundreds or thousands of dollars), then it's definitely not worth the registration fee.

Personally, I think there are very, very few domains left unregistered that are worth anything in and of themselves...and the ones that are worth something usually derive their value from some event that suddenly makes a certain phrase or language construct commercially important.

For example, there was a recent news item about a new invention dubbed a "telephone tooth." Here's a link to an article:

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020628/ap_on_hi_te/telephone_tooth_4

On the same day, the "nickname" for this new device, "telephone tooth," was regged. Regged too were other close variations following standard naming patterns: "toothphone.com," "phonetooth.com," etc.

Should this device become popular once mass-marketed, and people start internet searching for "telephone tooth," (and no TM issues exist), the domain name "telephonetooth.com" and close variants could become valuable.

Here are some thoughts on what types of domains have stand-alone, "intrinsic" value (I've posted these thoughts elsewhere...my apologies for the repetition):

It's important to keep in mind that the value of domain names, above their registration costs, is derived from their use as marketing tools. Comparison to "1-800" numbers illustrates this value.

Certain 1-800 numbers are worth a lot of money (although this market is in some way more complicated than domain names), because they can significantly extend a business' marketing reach.

If you were in the loans business, which phone # would you rather have: 1-877-EZEMONI or 1-800-FINANCE? The second one, of course. Spending equal amounts of advertising dollars promoting both phone numbers, you'd reasonably expect a greater sales response to 1-800-FINANCE. It's much more memorable and authoritative. You get more business response for the same advertising dollars spent. That's why it's worth spending more to secure the phone number 1-800-FINANCE.

The same thing applies to domains, not including the highly important "type-in" phenomenon, which is basically "business for free" (although some "blind dial-in" business does occur with top-tier 1-800 #'s).

Also, it is my sense that currently, with few exceptions, the only domains with stand-alone value are ".com's." Again, it is much like the "1-800" example: "1-800" has become so ingrained in the popular consciousness as the toll-free area code, that all toll-free extensions tend to be called "1-800 numbers." The human mnemonic default is "1-800" in the toll-free world, and it's ".com" in the internet world, at least in North America.

With this marketing foundation of domain value in mind, here's a suggestion for the categories of domains which hold true, intrinsic value (all in .com):

1) Short Domains: specifically, 2 & 3 letter (not character, although these can have value) domain names (e.g. "mz.com," "dpn.com").

2) Generic Words/Phrases: In this group are the heavyweight champions of the domain world ("stocks.com," "business.com," loans.com"), but even less commercially important single words can be valuable (see the recent discussion at dnf on "Skeletons.com"). Also includes domains like "PowerTools.com." "NewYorkRealEstate.com" is one of real estate agent Rob Grant's many keyterm real estate domains out of which he built an online real estate empire...there's a guy who saw the future of the internet.

3) Popular Phrases: This group can also include some highly valuable domains, like the famous "ForSaleByOwner.com" and "AsSeenOnTV.com." The key here is to identify compound word structures that are authoritative or highly attractive to markets which use the internet.

Of course, this isn't a complete list, and the many veteran domainers (safesys, snoopy) who frequent this board can add a lot more insight into what makes a domain name valuable.

But the bottom line is, if a domain doesn't have unique marketing strengths grounded in the real language used for a specific industry which utilizes the internet, it likely won't have any value, and will be a waste of registration money.

Miles
 

fizz

Level 8
Legacy Platinum Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2002
Messages
1,315
Reaction score
1
Feedback: 0 / 0 / 0
Wise words Miles, your handle is very apt.

The problem with registering domain names is that it’s addictive, and not unlike an addiction to nicotine or alcohol. It just doesn’t kill you as fast :(

Many of us here have amassed portfolios in the hundreds of names, only to let most drop a year later when it finally sinks in that they weren’t as great as they looked at 2.30am that Wednesday when you clicked the ‘register’ button.

It’s the instant gratification of that message lighting up your screen: ‘Congratulations, you have just registered eNightlyCash-advances.net’ which hooks you into it. We need a domain barman to say: ‘Hey buddy, don’tcha think you’ve regged enough?’ and while abrams1117’s idea of asking others is good, Miles is correct when he says if you have to ask someone, it’s probably not a domain worth regging.

If you combine Miles’ post here with the other questions in the thread started by aactive and added to by Genki, you’re looking at very valuable advice which can save you $$$.
 

namedancer

Level 4
Legacy Platinum Member
Joined
Apr 21, 2002
Messages
136
Reaction score
1
Feedback: 0 / 0 / 0
One thing that has helped me with overregging is my rule-- always sleep on it at least one night before regging, which I have followed at least 98% of the time. Sure I've still picked up some clunkers but most I've wanted to at least re-register a year later, thinking that if I don't sell them I'll use them for redirects, etc.

Good thoughts Miles on how to skim the dross.
 

David G

Internet Entrepreneur
Legacy Exclusive Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2002
Messages
5,755
Reaction score
63
Feedback: 137 / 0 / 0
Great post Miles, extremely valuable information. I also agree that if you need to ask someone else's opinion on a name, then it probably is not too good of a name to register.

I was also intrigued by your comments on "telephone tooth." A number of times lately I heard a news story on the evening news about a new medicine, scientific breakthru, new diet programs, something to do with the war on terror, little know product or service, even Pres Bush's newly announced health & fitness program (I forget the term he used - perhaps HealthUSA or something similar).

After hearing the news stories I run over to my computer to check the domain name referred to on the news and it's almost always registered, sometimes just a few days before the news story breaks. That could be because news of the story got out early (as is frequently bound to happen) and someone got an early start to reg the name.
 

fizz

Level 8
Legacy Platinum Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2002
Messages
1,315
Reaction score
1
Feedback: 0 / 0 / 0
Probably one of the President's scriptwriters is into domains and reg's them as he's writing the speech :)
 

fizz

Level 8
Legacy Platinum Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2002
Messages
1,315
Reaction score
1
Feedback: 0 / 0 / 0
iamgifting10milliondollarstothednforummemberfizz.com
 

abrams1117

Level 5
Legacy Gold Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2002
Messages
267
Reaction score
0
Feedback: 0 / 0 / 0
I have a list of DN's that SOLD (Some for $1000+) years ago, that now are available.

They don't do well on the overture search tool. Reg them? Don't? y/n/y/n/y/n...can't decide.......

With no other input , I'll just wait and see which are bought. If it/they then sell I'll grab whats left.
 

Guest
nice post miles.

i think if you *need* to ask other people to validate your choices then you are lacking the confidence needed to get the most from the domain business imo.

if you treat appraisals as simply sharing experiences and viewpoints, and don't take criticsm personally, then it can help your business by giving alternative inputs - but you should always have conviction in the domains you register and have a commercial basis as to why you registered them.
 

abrams1117

Level 5
Legacy Gold Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2002
Messages
267
Reaction score
0
Feedback: 0 / 0 / 0
RE:

how do you know they were once sold for $1000?

------------------------------------------

Thats just the info I have - I was just going over the list to see if more were available.

Its not a very long list and only one sold for $1,000+.

The others in the range of: $40 - $300.

Maybe these were bought during the Dot-Com rage when anything sold.

Today its a depression,
'Hey Buddy, can you spare a domain?'
 

abrams1117

Level 5
Legacy Gold Member
Joined
Jul 2, 2002
Messages
267
Reaction score
0
Feedback: 0 / 0 / 0
Thank you bennoart!

I'm just not getting enough sleep.... zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz .....?!...oh, yeah, it was BIDS not sales.

Either way, I'm not buying them, yet.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

The Rule #1

Do not insult any other member. Be polite and do business. Thank you!

Members Online

Sedo - it.com Premiums

IT.com

Premium Members

AucDom
UKBackorder
Register for the auction
MariaBuy

Our Mods' Businesses

UrlPick.com

*the exceptional businesses of our esteemed moderators

Top Bottom