Registrar Thread

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#22
Originally posted by thewitt
This ICANN document is about enforcing a mandatory grace period however, and not about when a Registrar must drop a domain after it expires.

The grace period allows you to renew your domain if you forget - as long as you do so within 45 days of the expiration.

Some Registrars have not been doing this, and this document talks about what ICANN proposed in it's March meeting to address the grace period.

-t

Network Solutions, on the other hand, has been holding onto domains for months after their registration has expired :D
A friend of mine renewed her domain 4 months after it expired. That was the only way to get it back.
 
#23
What's frustrating is that ICANN is apparently not interested in getting Registrars to drop domains that have expired, but only in making sure that the owner gets a valid chance at renewing their expired registration within 45 days.

I wish they would take up the former problem, but if you look at where things are going, they are only setting the stage for WLS - with a mandatory 45 day delay before a domain can be snatched by WLS.

-t
 
#24
Originally posted by thewitt
What's frustrating is that ICANN is apparently not interested in getting Registrars to drop domains that have expired, but only in making sure that the owner gets a valid chance at renewing their expired registration within 45 days.

I wish they would take up the former problem, but if you look at where things are going, they are only setting the stage for WLS - with a mandatory 45 day delay before a domain can be snatched by WLS.

-t
Under current specifications, registry operators (except for .name) will "auto-renew" all domain registrations at the time of their expiration. Registrars are immediately charged the registry fee for a one-year renewal of the registration. Registrars are then given forty-five days to attempt to secure a renewal payment from the current registrant. If the current registrant does not pay a renewal fee, the registrar explicitly deletes the registration. (See Subsection 3.7.5 of the Registrar Accreditation Agreement.) If the registrar deletes the registration within forty-five days after the auto-renewal, the registry operator credits the auto-renewal fee back to the registrar.
 
#26
This still does not address when the domain will actually drop however.

The currently proposed system which you quoted, will protect the registrant from losing his domain when it is has only been expired for one day, but it does nothing to get domains back into the marketplace any sooner.

There is nothing in this wording that requires a Registrar to actually drop an expired domain. The only thing this does is ensure that the domain's original registrant gets a 45 day grace period before losing the domain.

-t
 
#27
Originally posted by thewitt
This still does not address when the domain will actually drop however.

The currently proposed system which you quoted, will protect the registrant from losing his domain when it is has only been expired for one day, but it does nothing to get domains back into the marketplace any sooner.

There is nothing in this wording that requires a Registrar to actually drop an expired domain. The only thing this does is ensure that the domain's original registrant gets a 45 day grace period before losing the domain.

-t
I'm thinking that if the Registrar is AUTO charged the registration fee upon 1st day of expiration.. and having 45 days to re-reg this to the original registrant.. and having the ability to drop the name within the 45 days & get the $ credit back.. from the Registry Operators..
I'm thinking they will be dropN them within the 45 days.. or be stuck with a debt. But, guess that's where they sell the reg-name to a SnapName provider??

Who knows, but i'de think they would drop the name & get their credit back?

Wonder if that's why V-sign/NetSol are in troubled financial times.... maybe by NOT dropN those names.. and being charged for them?
 
#28
Ah, but they don't have to drop the name, only cancel the renewal. These are two different actions and are not forced by the Registry to be tied together.

The Registrar gets their money back, and the domain is still not available to be purchased by a new registrant.

-t
 
L

LtlPhysics

#29
Originally posted by WandaMay

If the registrar deletes the registration within forty-five days after the auto-renewal, the registry operator credits the auto-renewal fee back to the registrar.
That was my take on it too, it appeared that the registrar had to pay the registry to squat.

But, thewitt begs to differ, The Registrar gets their money back, and the domain is still not available to be purchased by a new registrant.

-t


I'll use my glasses the next time I read it.

That's a free ride for the registrars that claim to have created the name that was first formed in your mind. By extension, those registrars are making the claim that they have thought of everything, including the unknown future.

Register makes no bones, they say that they created and own your domain. The TOS's of NetSol/Reg/NameBargain are clearly adversarial. I found GoDaddy's TOS to be a little vague too. They trip all over the English language to avoid any hint that you might have had a hand in the creation of the name.

I emailed GoDaddy about it, and after a month or two I received a reply of "Why of course you own it." If so, I couldn't find it in their contract and they didn't point the way.

Gandi's TOS is refreshingly short, and after a few initial definitions, they state that you own the domain and that they are merely acting on your behalf.

There used to be a website titled, "DomainNameBuyersGuide: Unbiased advice on choosing a Domain Name Registrar." The link now goes to the Cheap Domain Name Company, the advice guys must have pulled the plug. They were far from comprehensive but they did take on the giants.
 
#30
Originally posted by WandaMay

Under current specifications, registry operators (except for .name) will "auto-renew" all domain registrations at the time of their expiration. Registrars are immediately charged the registry fee for a one-year renewal of the registration. Registrars are then given forty-five days to attempt to secure a renewal payment from the current registrant. If the current registrant does not pay a renewal fee, the registrar explicitly deletes the registration. (See Subsection 3.7.5 of the Registrar Accreditation Agreement.) If the registrar deletes the registration within forty-five days after the auto-renewal, the registry operator credits the auto-renewal fee back to the registrar.
__________________________________________________

Whether the registrar implements its own holding period or not, under current procedures domain names deleted within the forty- five day "auto-renew grace period" become available for re-registration immediately upon deletion by the sponsoring registrar.

Domain names deleted outside the auto-renew (or any other applicable) grace period are currently subject to a five- day "delete pending period," during which the registration can be recovered by the deleting registrar by means of a special request to the registry operator.

Essentially the new Redemption Grace Period would extend this delete pending period to thirty days (up from five), and apply it to all deletions – whether inside or outside of any applicable "grace period."
 
#31
Ms WandaMay,

Have you heard anything bad about SignatureDomains.com?
I registered a few names in the drop with them when they first started running their drop club. Seams they didn't like me getting names unless I was a "paying" customer. They froze my account. No transfers no access no renewal no account period. Anytime I tried to talk to support they told me that I violated their rules and that they had the right to close my account. I wasn't running scripts and I only had 1 browser open everything was manual.

About 2 months ago I sent them an email stating that I wanted to renew some names they replied that I must renew all the names in my account and all for 2 years. I forwarded the email to the abuse link at Internic calling them extortionists but never got a reply. Have you heard of anyone else have this trouble?

Regards,
Keith Ouellette
 
#32
Originally posted by WandaMay

Whether the registrar implements its own holding period or not, under current procedures domain names deleted within the forty- five day "auto-renew grace period" become available for re-registration immediately upon deletion by the sponsoring registrar.
Unfortunately this does not actually jive with current practice. It reads well in the proposal, but it's not what really happens. ICANN, as a toothless beast, also is lacking in enforcing any of it's guidelines.

The only discussion on this was about the safety net aspects of the proposal, and they skirted the issues about dropping names in a reasonable fashion.

http://www.icann.org/accra/captioning-afternoon-13mar02.htm

-t
 
#33
Originally posted by biznames
Ms WandaMay,

Have you heard anything bad about SignatureDomains.com?
I registered a few names in the drop with them when they first started running their drop club. Seams they didn't like me getting names unless I was a "paying" customer. They froze my account. No transfers no access no renewal no account period. Anytime I tried to talk to support they told me that I violated their rules and that they had the right to close my account. I wasn't running scripts and I only had 1 browser open everything was manual.

About 2 months ago I sent them an email stating that I wanted to renew some names they replied that I must renew all the names in my account and all for 2 years. I forwarded the email to the abuse link at Internic calling them extortionists but never got a reply. Have you heard of anyone else have this trouble?

Regards,
Keith Ouellette

OMG.. 'not cool' not cool at all, hmmm
I'll look into this... 4sure.
No.. i haven't heard any specific 'good' or 'bad' on S.Domains.

But, i will be researching this here, you've posted.

that's cyberRobbery, instead of HiWayRobbery..

it's wrong...

* in what way did they feel you violated the contract?

?? if you reg'd names though them, then that makes you a
paying customer, doesn't it??

wow.. unreal! thanx for the post.
 
#34
Originally posted by thewitt

Unfortunately this does not actually jive with current practice. It reads well in the proposal, but it's not what really happens. ICANN, as a toothless beast, also is lacking in enforcing any of it's guidelines.

The only discussion on this was about the safety net aspects of the proposal, and they skirted the issues about dropping names in a reasonable fashion.

http://www.icann.org/accra/captioning-afternoon-13mar02.htm

-t
yes.. clever lil devil's arn't they?

there is a link, i've posted it i know once..

where they invite 'public' opinions.. public comments.

that's where folks should speak up.. ya know?


evidently ICANN plays both sides of the fence.. hmmm
not good.. :confused:
 
#36
I just sent you an email with more details.

I thank you for looking into it and hope that this information helps your research in any way.
 
#37
Originally posted by timechange
Then they remove those public forums as soon as the heat increases.

Waste of time.
TC..

wasn't a 'forum' so to speak.. but more a 'public' comment email.. so the public can send their thoughts & sugg's.

i didn't see a 4M.. but.. maybe it's in existance? not sure.
 
#38
Originally posted by biznames
I just sent you an email with more details.

I thank you for looking into it and hope that this information helps your research in any way.
got it BizNames..

i'll be back in touch... as i know more..

i only want to post facts...


and thankyou for your post..

this thread needs to keep growing...

it will help with the e-book development. 4sure :)
 
#39
this may be irrelevant info to the oldies.. the veterans.. but for any newbies.. maybe this might help discern term's...


Domain Registration Glossary:
Administrative Contact:
One of the three contacts on a domain name registration. The administrative contact has the ability to update the domain and modify its details.

Billing Contact:
One of the three contacts on a domain name registration. The billing contact will receive invoice / billing details and be notified when the domain is up for renewal.

DNS:
A distributed database of information that is used to translate domain names, which are easy for humans to remember and use, into Internet Protocol (IP) numbers, which are what computers need to find each other on the Internet. People working on computers around the globe maintain their specific portion of this database, and the data held in each portion of the database is made available to all computers and users on the Internet. The DNS comprises computers, data files, software, and people working together.

IP Address:
A unique, numeric identifier used to specify hosts and networks. Internet Protocol (IP) numbers are part of a global, standardized scheme for identifying machines that are connected to the Internet. Technically speaking, IP numbers are 32 bit addresses that consist of four octets, and they are expressed as four numbers between 0 and 255, separated by periods, for example: 216.168.224.69. IP allocation for the Americas, the Caribbean, and sub-Saharan Africa are currently handled by the American Registry for Internet Numbers.

Name Server:
Also called a host or a name server. A computer that has both the software and the data (zone files) needed to resolve domain names to Internet Protocol (IP) numbers.

Registrant:
The individual or organization that registers a specific domain name with Network Solutions. This individual or organization holds the right to use that specific domain name for a specified period of time, provided certain conditions are met and the registration fees are paid. This person or organization is the "legal entity" bound by the terms of the Service Agreement.

Registry:
A registry is responsible for delegating Internet addresses such as Internet Protocol (IP) numbers and domain names, and keeping a record of those addresses and the information associated with their delegation. Examples of regional IP registries include Reseaux IP Europeens (RIPE), Asian-Pacific Network Information Center (APNIC), and the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN). Examples of domain name registries include Network Solutions' Registry operation (com, net, and org) and the ISO 3166 country code registries (e.g., fr, de, uk, us).

Technical Contact:
One of the three contacts on a domain name registration. The technical contact will be informed of any technical issues with the domain and has the authority to modify the domain record.

Top Level Domain:
In the Domain Name System (DNS), the highest level of the hierarchy after the root. In a domain name, that portion of the domain name that appears furthest to the right. For example, the com in domain.com. Also known as TLD.

Whois:
A searchable database maintained by the individual registries, which contains information about networks, networking organizations, domain names, and the contacts associated with them for the com, org, net, edu, and ISO 3166 country code top-level domains. Also, the protocol, or set of rules, that describes the application used to access the database. Other organizations have implemented the Whois protocol and maintain separate and distinct Whois databases for their respective domain
 
#40
Originally posted by WandaMay
To Register a .WS domain name..

Current Fees:
( All fees in US dollars)
4+ letters
(for example ABCD.WS) $35 per year
3-letter names
(for example ABC.WS) $1000 per year
1 or 2-letter names
(for example AB.WS) $2500 per year



Anyone had any luck 'reselling' .WS names?
__________________________________________________


HOT OFF THE PRESS.. this morn's news


NEWS RELEASE:

.WS (WebSite) Domains Strikes Landmark Deal:

GDI receives $2,250,860 for the rights to 311 "premium" .ws domain
names.

---
Last week, GDI (Global Domains International, Inc.), the registy for.ws
"web site" domains, closed a deal with a large publicly traded company,
one of the biggest players in the .com arena, and received payment in
full of $2,250,860 for the rights to a select group of "premium" .ws
domain names. The 311 domain names will be resold to the highest
bidders and ultimately developed into substantial .ws web sites, giving .ws
even more publicity down the road
 
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